Limyaael

[info]limyaael @ 05:33 pm: Quick book review
Just a quick book review; there are many, many more coming if I ever get back up to speed. *looks in despair at enormous piles of books, both read and unread*



Red Seas Under Red Skies, Scott Lynch

This is the direct sequel to The Lies of Locke Lamora, and one of those you really can’t summarize because doing so would give away too much about the first book. Suffice it to say that it does continue the adventures of Locke Lamora, master thief, in a far different setting than the previous book—in fact, settings, since he also becomes a pirate. If you read the first book for the thrilling detail behind the larceny plots, there is no drop in quality at all; in fact, I think this one is slightly better as far as that goes.

Alas, for me it was a disappointment. I think Locke is on the verge of becoming the lovable rogue archetype. He smashes threats too easily. At one point in the book, there is what looks like it will be a complicated problem for Locke, because for the first time he’s really thinking about the morality he’s ignored. And then the complicated problem turns out to have a simple solution. Um, no. It’s akin to having the hero “solve poverty” by taking the throne.

Also, I just can’t buy the idea of Locke as a Robin Hood, which is supposedly part of the appeal of the books. First of all, he doesn’t steal money from the rich and give it to the poor; he steals money from the rich and keeps it for himself. That’s a rather important distinction. Second, I don’t care if he was born in one of the poorest parts of his own city; he’s been raised and trained to be essentially a nobleman. So he has all kinds of advantages that other people around him don’t have. At several points in the story, despite the danger threatening Locke, I was rolling my eyes because so much of the danger was a result of his own actions that I couldn't truly pity him. Locke wasn’t someone forced into defending himself from an enemy who attacked out of the blue, the way he was in the first book. He made enemies. On purpose. Excuse me if I don’t think that their striking back is really unjustified, and if the “straight white privileged male angst about reasonable consequences” is getting a bit boring.

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